ScienceDaily – Artificial Intelligence News

  • Researchers get humans to think like computers
    Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school buses. People aren't supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, researchers show most people actually can. Read more »
  • Brain-inspired AI inspires insights about the brain (and vice versa)
    Researchers have described the results of experiments that used artificial neural networks to predict with greater accuracy than ever before how different areas in the brain respond to specific words. The work employed a type of recurrent neural network called long short-term memory (LSTM) that includes in its calculations the relationships of each word to what came before to better preserve context. Read more »
  • Robotic 'gray goo'
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    Researchers have demonstrated for the first time a way to make a robot composed of many loosely coupled components, or 'particles.' Unlike swarm or modular robots, each component is simple, and has no individual address or identity. In their system, which the researchers call a 'particle robot,' each particle can perform only uniform volumetric oscillations (slightly expanding and contracting), but cannot move independently. Read more »
  • Google research shows how AI can make ophthalmologists more effective
    As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently perform. But a new study shows that physicians and algorithms working together are more effective than either alone. Read more »
  • The robots that dementia caregivers want: Robots for joy, robots for sorrow
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    A team of scientists spent six months co-designing robots with informal caregivers for people with dementia, such as family members. They found that caregivers wanted the robots to fulfill two major roles: support positive moments shared by caregivers and their loved ones; and lessen caregivers' emotional stress by taking on difficult tasks, such as answering repeated questions and restricting unhealthy food. Read more »
  • Water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities created
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    Inspired by jellyfish, researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions. The novel material has wide-ranging uses, from water-resistant touch screens to soft robots aimed at mimicking biological tissues. Read more »
  • Seeing through a robot's eyes helps those with profound motor impairments
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    An interface system that uses augmented reality technology could help individuals with profound motor impairments operate a humanoid robot to feed themselves and perform routine personal care tasks such as scratching an itch and applying skin lotion. The web-based interface displays a 'robot's eye view' of surroundings to help users interact with the world through the machine. Read more »
  • Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics?
    A new study has demonstrated mathematically that algorithms based on deep neural networks can be applied to better understand the world of quantum physics, as well. Read more »
  • How intelligent is artificial intelligence?
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    Scientists are putting AI systems to a test. Researchers have developed a method to provided a glimpse into the diverse 'intelligence' spectrum observed in current AI systems, specifically analyzing these AI systems with a novel technology that allows automatized analysis and quantification. Read more »
  • Faster robots demoralize co-workers
    New research finds that when robots are beating humans in contests for cash prizes, people consider themselves less competent and expend slightly less effort -- and they tend to dislike the robots. Read more »
  • A robotic leg, born without prior knowledge, learns to walk
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    Researchers believe they have become the first to create an AI-controlled robotic limb driven by animal-like tendons that can even be tripped up and then recover within the time of the next footfall, a task for which the robot was never explicitly programmed to do. Read more »
  • How to train your robot (to feed you dinner)
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    Researchers have developed a robotic system that can feed people who need someone to help them eat. Read more »
  • Ultra-low power chips help make small robots more capable
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    An ultra-low power hybrid chip inspired by the brain could help give palm-sized robots the ability to collaborate and learn from their experiences. Combined with new generations of low-power motors and sensors, the new application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) -- which operates on milliwatts of power -- could help intelligent swarm robots operate for hours instead of minutes. Read more »
  • Robots can detect breast cancer as well as radiologists
    A new article suggests that artificial intelligence systems may be able to perform as accurately as radiologists in the evaluation of digital mammography in breast cancer screening. Read more »
  • Neurodegenerative diseases identified using artificial intelligence
    Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence platform to detect a range of neurodegenerative disease in human brain tissue samples, including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Read more »
  • Mini cheetah is the first four-legged robot to do a backflip
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    New mini cheetah robot is springy and light on its feet, with a range of motion that rivals a champion gymnast. The four-legged powerpack can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right-side up or upside down. The robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person's walking speed. Read more »
  • Spiking tool improves artificially intelligent devices
    The aptly named software package Whetstone enables neural computer networks to process information up to 100 times more efficiently than current standards, making possible an increased use of artificial intelligence in mobile phones, self-driving cars, and image interpretation. Read more »
  • Robots track moving objects with unprecedented precision
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    A novel system uses RFID tags to help robots home in on moving objects with unprecedented speed and accuracy. The system could enable greater collaboration and precision by robots working on packaging and assembly, and by swarms of drones carrying out search-and-rescue missions. Read more »
  • Artificial intelligence to boost Earth system science
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    A new study shows that artificial intelligence can substantially improve our understanding of the climate and the Earth system. Read more »
  • The first walking robot that moves without GPS
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    Desert ants are extraordinary solitary navigators. Researchers were inspired by these ants as they designed AntBot, the first walking robot that can explore its environment randomly and go home automatically, without GPS or mapping. This work opens up new strategies for navigation in autonomous vehicles and robotics. Read more »
  • Getting a grip on human-robot cooperation
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    There is a time when a successful cooperation between humans and robots has decisive importance: it is in the precise moment that one "actor" is required to hand an object to another "actor" and, therefore, to coordinate their actions accordingly. But how can we make this interaction more natural for robots? Read more »
  • Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement
    By zeroing in on humans' gait, body symmetry and foot placement, researchers are teaching self-driving cars to recognize and predict pedestrian movements with greater precision than current technologies. Read more »
  • Toward automated animal identification in wildlife research
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    A new program automatically detects regions of interest within images, alleviating a serious bottleneck in processing photos for wildlife research. Read more »
  • Psychology: Robot saved, people take the hit
    To what extent are people prepared to show consideration for robots? A new study suggests that, under certain circumstances, some people are willing to endanger human lives -- out of concern for robots. Read more »
  • Citizen science projects have a surprising new partner, the computer
    Data scientists and citizen science experts partnered with ecologists who often study wildlife populations by deploying camera traps. These camera traps are remote, independent devices, triggered by motion and infrared sensors that provide researchers with images of passing animals. The researchers built skill sets to help computers identify other animals, such as a deer or squirrel, with even fewer images. Read more »
  • Walking with Pokémon
    In a recent study, researchers reveal how the Pokémon GO augmented reality game positively impact the physical activity in players over 40. The authors hope the findings will inform urban planners and game designers to inspire people to be more active. Read more »
  • Robot combines vision and touch to learn the game of Jenga
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    Machine-learning approach could help robots assemble cellphones and other small parts in a manufacturing line. Read more »
  • Atari master: New AI smashes Google DeepMind in video game challenge
    A new breed of algorithms has mastered Atari video games 10 times faster than state-of-the-art AI, with a breakthrough approach to problem solving. Read more »
  • Most people overlook artificial intelligence despite flawless advice
    A team of researchers recently discovered that most people overlook artificial intelligence despite flawless advice. AI-like systems will be an integral part of the Army's strategy over the next five years, so system designers will need to start getting a bit more creative in order to appeal to users. Read more »
  • Engineers translate brain signals directly into speech
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    In a scientific first, neuroengineers have created a system that translates thought into intelligible, recognizable speech. This breakthrough, which harnesses the power of speech synthesizers and artificial intelligence, could lead to new ways for computers to communicate directly with the brain. Read more »
  • Defending against cyberattacks by giving attackers 'false hope'
    'The quarantine is a decoy that behaves very similar to the real compromised target to keep the attacker assuming that the attack is still succeeding. In a typical cyberattack the more deeply attackers go in the system, the more they have the ability to go many directions. It becomes like a Whack-A-Mole game for those defending the system. Our strategy simply changes the game, but makes the attackers think they are being successful.' Read more »
  • Self-driving cars, robots: Identifying AI 'blind spots'
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    A novel model identifies instances in which autonomous systems have 'learned' from training examples that don't match what's actually happening in the real world. Engineers could use this model to improve the safety of artificial intelligence systems, such as driverless vehicles and autonomous robots. Read more »
  • The first tendril-like soft robot able to climb
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    Researchers have made the first soft robot mimicking plant tendrils: it is able to curl and climb, using the same physical principles determining water transport in plants. In the future this tendril-like soft robot could inspire the development of wearable devices, such as soft braces, able to actively morph their shape. Read more »
  • Increasing skepticism against robots
    In Europe, people are more reserved regarding robots than they were five years ago. Read more »
  • Artificial intelligence can dramatically cut time needed to process abnormal chest X-rays
    New research has found that a novel Artificial Intelligence (AI) system can dramatically reduce the time needed to ensure that abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings will receive an expert radiologist opinion sooner, cutting the average delay from 11 days to less than three days. Chest X-rays are routinely performed to diagnose and monitor a wide range of conditions affecting the lungs, heart, bones, and soft tissues. Read more »
  • Smart microrobots that can adapt to their surroundings
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    Scientists have developed tiny elastic robots that can change shape depending on their surroundings. Modeled after bacteria and fully biocompatible, these robots optimize their movements so as to get to hard-to-reach areas of the human body. They stand to revolutionize targeted drug delivery. Read more »
  • Measuring ability of artificial intelligence to learn is difficult
    Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study has found. Read more »
  • 'Ambidextrous' robots could dramatically speed e-commerce
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    Engineers present a novel, 'ambidextrous' approach to grasping a diverse range of object shapes without training. Read more »
  • Smart home tests first elder care robot
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    Researchers believe the robot, nicknamed RAS, could eventually help those with dementia and other limitations continue to live independently in their own homes. Read more »
  • Artificial bug eyes
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    Single lens eyes, like those in humans and many other animals, can create sharp images, but the compound eyes of insects and crustaceans have an edge when it comes to peripheral vision, light sensitivity and motion detection. That's why scientists are developing artificial compound eyes to give sight to autonomous vehicles and robots, among other applications. Now, a new report describes the preparation of bioinspired artificial compound eyes using a simple low-cost approach. Read more »
  • Can artificial intelligence tell a teapot from a golf ball?
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    How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? They have improved greatly in recent years, but still have a long way to go, according to a team of cognitive psychologists. Read more »
  • How game theory can bring humans and robots closer together
    Researchers have for the first time used game theory to enable robots to assist humans in a safe and versatile manner. Read more »
  • Bees can count with small number of nerve cells in their brains, research suggests
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    Bees can solve seemingly clever counting tasks with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains, according to researchers. Read more »
  • New AI computer vision system mimics how humans visualize and identify objects
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    Researchers have demonstrated a computer system that can discover and identify the real-world objects it 'sees' based on the same method of visual learning that humans use. Read more »
  • Robots with sticky feet can climb up, down, and all around
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    Researchers have created a micro-robot whose electroadhesive foot pads, inspired by the pads on a gecko's feet, allow it to climb on vertical and upside-down conductive surfaces, like the inside walls of a commercial jet engine. Groups of them could one day be used to inspect complicated machinery and detect safety issues sooner, while reducing maintenance costs. Read more »
  • Computer hardware designed for 3D games could hold the key to replicating human brain
    Researchers have created the fastest and most energy efficient simulation of part of a rat brain using off-the-shelf computer hardware. Read more »
  • Computer chip vulnerabilities discovered
    A research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics. Read more »
  • New models sense human trust in smart machines
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    New 'classification models' sense how well humans trust intelligent machines they collaborate with, a step toward improving the quality of interactions and teamwork. Read more »
  • Mountain splendor? Scientists know where your eyes will look
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    Using precise brain measurements, researchers predicted how people's eyes move when viewing natural scenes, an advance in understanding the human visual system that can improve a host of artificial intelligence efforts, such as the development of driverless cars. Read more »
  • Computers successfully trained to identify animals in photos
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    Researchers trained a deep neural network to classify wildlife species using 3.37 million camera-trap images of 27 species of animals obtained from five states across the United States. The model then was tested on nearly 375,000 animal images at a rate of about 2,000 images per minute on a laptop computer, achieving 97.6 percent accuracy -- likely the highest accuracy to date in using machine learning for wildlife image classification. Read more »
  • Smarter AI: Machine learning without negative data
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    A research team has successfully developed a new method for machine learning that allows an AI to make classifications without what is known as 'negative data,' a finding which could lead to wider application to a variety of classification tasks. Read more »
  • Aquatic animals that jump out of water inspire leaping robots
    Ever watch aquatic animals jump out of the water and wonder how they manage to do it in such a streamlined and graceful way? Researchers who specialize in water entry and exit in nature had the same question. Read more »
  • Model of quantum artificial life on quantum computer
    Researchers have developed a quantum biomimetic protocol that reproduces the characteristic process of Darwinian evolution adapted to the language of quantum algorithms and quantum computing. The researchers anticipate a future in which machine learning, artificial intelligence and artificial life itself will be combined on a quantum scale. Read more »
  • Android child's face strikingly expressive
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    Android faces must express greater emotion if robots are to interact with humans more effectively. Researchers tackled this challenge as they upgraded their android child head, named Affetto. They precisely examined Affetto's facial surface points and the precise balancing of different forces necessary to achieve more human-like motion. Through mechanical measurements and mathematical modeling, they were able to use their findings to greatly enhance Affetto's range of emotional expression. Read more »
  • AI capable of outlining in a single chart information from thousands of scientific papers
    Scientists have developed a Computer-Aided Material Design (CAMaD) system capable of extracting information related to fabrication processes and material structures and properties -- factors vital to material design -- and organizing and visualizing the relationship between them. The use of this system enables information from thousands of scientific and technical articles to be summarized in a single chart, rationalizing and expediting material design. Read more »
  • Artificial intelligence may fall short when analyzing data across multiple health systems
    A new study shows deep learning models must be carefully tested across multiple environments before being put into clinical practice. Read more »
  • Codebreaker Turing's theory explains how shark scales are patterned
    A system proposed by world war two codebreaker Alan Turing more than 60 years ago can explain the patterning of tooth-like scales possessed by sharks, according to new research. Read more »
  • Could machines using artificial intelligence make doctors obsolete?
    The technology of these tools is evolving rapidly. Standalone machines can now perform limited tasks raising the question of whether machines will ever completely replace doctors? Read more »
  • New method peeks inside the 'black box' of artificial intelligence
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    Computer scientists have developed a promising new approach for interpreting machine learning algorithms. Unlike previous efforts, which typically sought to 'break' the algorithms by removing key words from inputs to yield the wrong answer, the researchers instead reduced the inputs to the bare minimum required to yield the correct answer. On average, the researchers got the correct answer with an input of less than three words. Read more »
  • Shape-shifting robots perceive surroundings, make decisions for first time
    Researchers have developed modular robots that can perceive their surroundings, make decisions and autonomously assume different shapes in order to perform various tasks -- an accomplishment that brings the vision of adaptive, multipurpose robots a step closer to reality. Read more »
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